physiquality blog: working out while staying at home

I think we can all admit that we’re a little stir crazy at this point. My household has been quarantining for a month, and even the dog jumps at the chance to get outside. And she’s a bulldog — she hates exercise.

I liked that the advice from our physical therapist members focused on living healthy and keeping the best habits we can. While some of us might be able to write King Lear while avoiding the plague, most of us are in survival mode. But I do want to create the best habits I can knowing that this could last at least another month, and knowing that exercise is not only good for the body, but also the mind.

Working out while staying at home

with advice from Coury and Buehler Physical Therapy, Physical Therapy and Wellness Institute, Rocklin Physical Therapy, and Strive Physical Therapy and Sports Rehabilitation

It might seem hard to look on the bright side these days. News is grim, and it looks like most of us will need to stay socially distant for some time. For people who rely on exercise classes to stay healthy, it’s another loss on top of the interactions we had at work or school.

But even in this challenging time there are plenty of ways to stay positive and healthy. Coury and Buehler Physical Therapy, a Physiquality member in Orange County, California, reminds us that it’s important to create a new routine to get ourselves through a stay-at-home order. It doesn’t have to be elaborate, but by simply getting up at the same time every day (even if it’s a little later than it used to be), showering and making your bed will help you approach each day with a more positive outlook.

Exercising regularly in particular can help both your mental and physical health. Many healthcare professionals are finding ways to help us stay well while staying at home. Here are some examples of how physical therapy clinics in the Physiquality network are helping people at home:

Read the full entry at physiquality.com!

physiquality blog: coronavirus and physical therapy

We have all entered a new normal. Parents are learning how to work from home when kids are running around. Everyone is trying to follow the latest social distancing rules, whether that means getting take out instead of eating in or bumping ankles instead of shaking hands.

And anyone trying to recuperate from injury is certainly wondering what’s safe in this environment. My colleagues at PTPN sent these guidelines to their members, and any concerned patients should follow up with their own PT clinics to make sure they are following similar guidelines to keep everyone safe.

Coronavirus and physical therapy

advice from PTPN, Physiquality’s parent company

Among the many concerns you have about the novel coronavirus (COVID-19), are you wondering about attending physical therapy appointments? The good news is that, for now, outpatient therapy clinics are considered a relatively low-risk environment for exposure, and most clinics are well-versed in proper disinfection and protection procedures.

Here’s a list of best practices that therapy offices should be following. Feel free to call your physical therapist and ask about the office’s safety precautions, as well as what your therapist’s recommendation is for you regarding physical therapy appointments.

Read the full entry at physiquality.com!

physiquality blog: obesity: what are the risks, and how can physical therapy help?

with advice from Progressive Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation and AED Superstore

The word has been out for a while: Obesity is on the rise in America. A study published last year by JAMA (the Journal of the American Medical Association) showed that no matter which way you look at the data (all adults, men vs. women, specific age groups), more people are obese in all of these categories than there were 10 years ago.

What can contribute to obesity?

A variety of factors can lead to obesity, explains AED Superstore, a Preferred Vendor for PTPN (Physiquality’s parent company). Yes, it can be the result of eating more than you should and moving less than you should. But sometimes it’s a good idea to consider why you might be doing that.

To learn more, read the full entry at physiquality.com.

physiquality blog: is this your first time at physical therapy?

Having gone through this process several times, this was one of the easier posts to conceive (and one of the harder ones to make sure I was citing outside sources). I’ve been advised to do several of these things, like wearing shorts, talking about expectations, and writing down questions, even after your first appointment.

Any time you think of something to ask your PT, write it down. Once you’re in the thick of your appointment, it’s easy to forget to ask such things.

Is this your first time at physical therapy?

with advice from Foothills Sports Medicine Physical Therapy and Mitch Kaye, PT

So you’ve been having knee pain for a while, and you’re considering physical therapy. What should you expect when you go for your first appointment?

In honor of National Physical Therapy Month, let’s take a look at some things to consider as you start therapy:

Before you even walk through the door, fill out as much of the paperwork as you can. Your doctor will forward on any tests or diagnoses made at her clinic, notes Bethany Urquidez, a physical therapist at Foothills Sports Medicine Physical Therapy (a Physiquality network member in Arizona). However, your PT will have specific questions about how your body feels and moves, as well as needing the typical insurance paperwork. A lot of physical therapy clinics will have all the required paperwork posted to their website, making it easy to fill out before you arrive for your first appointment.

Read the full entry at physiquality.com!

physiquality blog: will I have arthritis after my knee injury?

As a person who has had five knee surgeries now, this is a very personal subject. One particular pre-op appointment comes to mind. I was living in Los Angeles, and I was preparing for a cartilage implant. After years and years of dance (many on tile floors), I’ve shredded my cartilage, and the doctors agreed this would help to repair the hole in my right knee’s cartilage.

So I go to see my GP for blood work the week before surgery. He looks at what is supposed to be done, looks up at me, and asks when I’m going to have my knee replaced. I dunno doc, can I get through this surgery (that’s supposed to delay a knee replacement) first?

In my own estimation, I was doomed from the beginning. I had arthritis in my right knee at 14. My left knee started sounding like Rice Krispies in my 30s. But I know that if I don’t remain active, I’ll simply put on more weight, and I’ll be more at risk for arthritis, as well as lots of other things. So it’s better to be as active as I can, with the hopes of postponing these other issues and surgeries as long as possible.

Will I have arthritis after my knee injury?

with advice from Mitch Kaye, PT

Unfortunately, if you have a traumatic injury to the knee like an ACL tear, a meniscus tear or even certain types of fractures, your chance of developing osteoarthritis increases significantly.

Osteoarthritis, which is the wearing away of cartilage, can occur normally with years of use, but it can also occur more readily after trauma around the knee. The Arthritis Foundation estimates that 700,000 knee injuries a year account for 12.5% of post-traumatic arthritis cases in the U.S., and they warn that younger athletes with ACL injuries are at risk of developing arthritis before they are 40 years old, often within 10 years of the original injury.

If you’re an athlete who has had one of these types of injuries, it’s not something you probably wanted to hear.

Read the full entry at physiquality.com!